Practicing Music: How the Professionals Do It – Lang/Wilson

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Description

Successful professional musicians—instrumentalists and vocalists alike—are always busy. Performing, teaching, family, and professional responsibilities keep them on the go around the clock, yet they still find time to practice so that they can maintain technique, prepare for upcoming performances, and thrive as a musician. In this eye-opening essay collection, these world-renowned artists share their insights on practice, from practical tips you can use today to the intangible lessons of living a musical life:

– Paul Austerlitz
– Chris Bacas
– Stefan Bauer
– Evangeline Benedetti
– Serena Benedetti
– Bruce Bonvissuto
– John Bruschini
– Norman Carey
– Jennifer Choi
– Peter Erskine
– Lars Frandsen
– Gordon Gottlieb
– Hill Greene
– John Isley
– Vic Juris
– Aline Kiryayeva
– Morris “Arnie” Lang
– Deb Lyons
– Jacqueline Martelle
– Shoko Nagai and Satoshi Takeishi
– Andy Narell
– Isabelle O’Connell
– Richard O’Donnell
– Victor Rendón
– Sonny Rollins
– Jay Rosen
– Michael Rosen
– Terry Silverlight
– Andrew White, III
– Brian Willson

Dr. Brian Willson is a professional musician, educator, author, and student of African Diaspora heritage in the Americas. As a percussionist/conductor/lecturer he has performed in over 25 countries, working with a wide variety of artists including Big Nick Nicholas, Katy Roberts, Morris Lang, Pauline Oliveros, Ivo Perelman, Rasul Siddik, the Mystery Brothers, Salim Washington, Brooklyn Philharmonic, Freddie MacGregor, Gloria Gaynor, Roberta Flack; along with numerous tours of the Broadway shows A Chorus Line, Evita, and Chess. His work is represented on over 15 recordings, DVDs, and television specials.

Morris Lang attended the Juilliard School. In 1955, shortly after graduation, he was appointed Associate Principal Timpanist and percussionist with the New York Philharmonic. He has performed with music directors from Leonard Bernstein, Pierre Boulez, Zubin Mehta to Kurt Mazur on hundreds of recordings and on television including the famous Leonard Bernstein’s “Young People’s Concerts” and “Live from Lincoln Center.”